Sunday Well Spent: 20 Ideas


By Morgan Slade Content Creation

Courage is not the absence of fear. Courage is showing up in spite of it.

Sunday is often referred to as a day of rest and reflection. It’s day when we can minimize the noise of the world and focus on our most important relationships. It’s also a day when we can fill our own cups in order to more fully serve others (including our own families) and accomplish our goals during the week.

Here are 20 things we do to help us recharge our own batteries, reconnect with God, and reinforce our most important relationships on Sunday.

  1. Enjoy an unplugged Sunday. Put your cell phones away, turn off your notifications, and silence your digital distractions. Taking this time away from all the technology of the world makes it more able to plug into God and listen to Him. It is also a great way to plug into our families.
  2. Write a thank you card to someone who has helped you recently. Have your kids write one as well! I once had a volunteer position in my church that required a lot of time and service. One Sunday after church I noticed a note wedged in my front door. This note, was written by an anonymous youth I had been serving and it expressed gratitude. It made me feel relevant, loved, and grateful. Ever since my family and I have made it a goal to write thank you notes to those who serve us.
  3. Go for a walk outside. Abbey loves to walk around the block each Sunday with her family. They push their little lady on her bike, her two boys pass the football back and forth, and it’s a great time for her and her husband to talk and catch up. Just being together with no distractions and in the fresh air helps her family to connect with each other and recharge. 
  4. Sit down and update your journal for the week. Abbey isn’t great at journaling, but she has found a great alternative that works for her. Throughout the week she makes little notes about things that have happened in her kids lives. On Sundays, she takes time to sit down and write letters to them in a journal about lessons they learned and things she has observed about them. You can check out some of the snippets here. If you don’t like journaling and don’t have a blog I like to type my “journal” in a google doc. There’s even an app enabling you to do this from your phone.
  5. “Heart Attack” someone. Cut out paper hearts and write positive things about someone and then decorate their door with them. This is fun thing for your kids to do. We’ve done this to new neighbors just to make them feel loved and welcomed to the neighborhood.
  6. Read the scriptures. Need help starting? We post our favorite scriptures on our instagram account.
  7. Have a family trivia night. Write down fun memories about each family member and exclude their names. Draw the memories out of a bowl and try to guess who the memory is referring to. You can even save the papers and put them in a binder. We call this binder our “family journal.”
  8. Create a gratitude list. Teach your kids to do this too. Abbey’s oldest son learned this from a Sunday School lesson and he now has a full notebook of all the things he is grateful for. I do this for myself but in addition to writing things down I take pictures of things I am grateful for and hang them on my wall. I change the photos frequently and tuck away the photos that aren’t on display in a safe spot and frequently look through them with my kids.                     
  9. Write a kind note to someone you’ve been thinking about lately. Including your kids. This is a great way to help them to learn to be aware of people around them. My little boy did this once and took all the notes to school. He wrote one kind thing about each of his classmates. I didn’t get to see the reaction from his peers, but I did get to see the joy apparent in his countenance as he pondered about each kind statement.
  10. Call a loved one to let them know you are thinking of them. Abbey’s family loves Facetiming with her kids grandparents because they don’t live close to them. This is a great tradition that helps them regularly keep in contact. Once a month we try and visit family members that live near us. We also facetime grandparents every Sunday.
  11. Find a gospel related quote and write it down. Display it throughout the coming week in a place where you will see it often. I’ve come to find that these quotes can serve as motivation, light, and positive reminders that help me navigate challenges throughout my week.
  12. Pray in a quiet place and focus on thanking God for the things you are grateful for rather than asking God for something. We should never feel as if we can’t ask God for things but when we remember to thank Him, our relationship with Him is strengthened. When we remember our blessings and that God is the source of our blessings we acknowledge His presence in our daily lives.
  13. Tell each member of your family something you admire about them. Often times we assume that because we live with each other that our kids, spouses, and other family members know how we feel about them. We should never assume. We should always . make it a point to verbalize, and display how we feel about those we love. In doing so we strengthen our connections.
  14. Make cookies and deliver them to a neighbor or someone who has been on your mind lately. When we do this we put the plates of cookies in our red wagon. We’ve named it our “cookie wagon.” This is a fun tradition that enables my kids to serve others and see how their service makes others feel.
  15. Take a Nap. Giving yourself permission to rest is liberating and literally refreshing. Every Sunday I take at least a 30 minute nap and it is always something I look forward to.
  16. Read a good book. Making time to read is not something we regularly prioritize. Sunday is a great day to schedule time for reading your favorite book.   
  17. Write down your goals, and write a report on your progress each Sunday after you’ve written them. Often times looking at our goals on a daily basis can cause us to feel anxious, and overwhelmed. For our businesses we call this the “Review and Preview,” yet we can easily apply these simple tasks to benefit our personal lives as well.  Looking at them on a weekly basis however, can help us with personal accountability, all while letting us reflect on our progress.
  18. Visit the elderly, lonely, or sick. When I was younger we used to take Sunday dinner to three people. One was my Grandpa, and two were neighbors who were living alone. Being able to spend that time with my Grandpa and see the gratitude on the faces of my elderly neighbors are some of my best memories.
  19. Attend a church meeting. Church is a place we often find community, but church should also be a safe place that we can learn from those around us about God, all while testifying of Him ourselves. Church is often a place where we receive answers to our prayers, and a place where new questions are born.
  20. Brainstorm ideas on how you can do an act of kindness each day for the coming week. Recently I’ve adopted this practice and I’ve noticed that my overall attitude has improved. Doing something kind everyday doesn’t have to be meticulously planned, but brainstorming small ways to show kindness can immediately help us gain a fresh perspective as we navigate unique challenges in our own lives throughout the week.

We hope this list of things to do on Sunday helps you strengthen your relationship with God and the most important people in your lives . We hope that as you ponder ways to spend your Sunday you choose activities that quiet the noise of the world, give you peace, and provide you with hope.

If you need help finding more ways to find harmony with your life we have a box full of tools in The Blueprint. We would love for you to join us!